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2016 Statute



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21-5202.Culpable mental state; definition of intentionally, knowingly, recklessly. (a) Except as otherwise provided, a culpable mental state is an essential element of every crime defined by this code. A culpable mental state may be established by proof that the conduct of the accused person was committed "intentionally," "knowingly" or "recklessly."

(b) Culpable mental states are classified according to relative degrees, from highest to lowest, as follows:

(1) Intentionally;

(2) knowingly;

(3) recklessly.

(c) Proof of a higher degree of culpability than that charged constitutes proof of the culpability charged. If recklessness suffices to establish an element, that element also is established if a person acts knowingly or intentionally. If acting knowingly suffices to establish an element, that element also is established if a person acts intentionally.

(d) If the definition of a crime does not prescribe a culpable mental state, a culpable mental state is nevertheless required unless the definition plainly dispenses with any mental element.

(e) If the definition of a crime does not prescribe a culpable mental state, but one is nevertheless required under subsection (d), "intent," "knowledge" or "recklessness" suffices to establish criminal responsibility.

(f) If the definition of a crime prescribes a culpable mental state that is sufficient for the commission of a crime, without distinguishing among the material elements thereof, such provision shall apply to all the material elements of the crime, unless a contrary purpose plainly appears.

(g) If the definition of a crime prescribes a culpable mental state with regard to a particular element or elements of that crime, the prescribed culpable mental state shall be required only as to specified element or elements, and a culpable mental state shall not be required as to any other element of the crime unless otherwise provided.

(h) A person acts "intentionally," or "with intent," with respect to the nature of such person's conduct or to a result of such person's conduct when it is such person's conscious objective or desire to engage in the conduct or cause the result. All crimes defined in this code in which the mental culpability requirement is expressed as "intentionally" or "with intent" are specific intent crimes. A crime may provide that any other culpability requirement is a specific intent.

(i) A person acts "knowingly," or "with knowledge," with respect to the nature of such person's conduct or to circumstances surrounding such person's conduct when such person is aware of the nature of such person's conduct or that the circumstances exist. A person acts "knowingly," or "with knowledge," with respect to a result of such person's conduct when such person is aware that such person's conduct is reasonably certain to cause the result. All crimes defined in this code in which the mental culpability requirement is expressed as "knowingly," "known," or "with knowledge" are general intent crimes.

(j) A person acts "recklessly" or is "reckless," when such person consciously disregards a substantial and unjustifiable risk that circumstances exist or that a result will follow, and such disregard constitutes a gross deviation from the standard of care which a reasonable person would exercise in the situation.

History: L. 2010, ch. 136, § 13; July 1, 2011.



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2017. Powered by KLISS. Rendered: 2017-11-08T09:04:38. Head Rev No: 336521